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April Press Release

April Press Release

04/2018                                                                                                                                                      APRIL EDITION

                                          

                                                                                  PBWI large

April is Women’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month. While all women are different, they all have one thing in common: an increased risk for eye diseases. 

Did you know?

  • On average, women live longer than men and many eye diseases are brought on due to aging.

  •  In the U.S., 63% of those that are blind and 62% of those visually impaired are women. 

  • Common eye diseases that affect women include age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, and dry eye.

 

Protect your vision health:                                                                         

   dialted eye exam

Get regular,

dilated eye exams 

   sunglasses

Wear UV-A/

UV-B sunglasses

   family tree

Know your

family history

   no smoking

Quit smoking

Women’s Eye Health: Aging and Our Eyes

As we age, our eyes age too. Women 50 years and older are at an increased risk for age-related macular degeneration. Additionally, women going through menopause and in postmenopause are more likely to experience dry eye.       

        

 

What is Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)?

Age-related macular degeneration affects the macula of the eye, the area that focuses on central vision. Caucasian women are at the highest risk for AMD as they age. AMD can lead to severe visual impairment and vision loss. 

                  mac degen view

Prevention and Treatment of AMD

There is no way to prevent AMD, but there is a way to prevent serious vision loss from the disease: receiving dilated eye exams as recommended by your eye doctor. 

Learn more about protecting your vision from AMD.

 

What is Dry Eye?

Dry eye is a condition that occurs when the eyes do not produce enough tears or the consistency of tears is not effective in lubricating the eye. Symptoms of dry eye include: burning or stinging of the eyes, a sandy/gritty feeling in the eye, blurred vision, and excess tear production followed by extreme dry periods. 

Prevention and Treatment of Dry Eye 

While there is no cure for dry eye, there are methods people can use to decrease the severity of the symptoms:

  • Avoid cigarette smoke
  • Take fish oil supplements
  • Use a humidifier in your room to keep extra moisture in the air
  • Use over-the-counter artificial tears/ointment but only if prescribed by your eye doctor

Click here to learn more about dry eye.         

Pregnancy and Your Vision

   Baby April Press Release                               ABC's                                    stroller                                  Rattle

                       

If you are pregnant, it is important to be aware of your vision health. Due to frequent fluctuating blood sugar levels and hormonal changes, pregnant women are at an increased risk for vision complications. 

It is highly recommended that women receive a dilated eye exam during the first trimester of their pregnancy to ensure their vision is healthy. Your eye doctor may decide to continue dilated eye exams throughout the pregnancy. 

Learn more about pregnancy and your vision.

 

Cosmetics and Your Vision

Some women have had the same makeup in their makeup drawers for years. Eye makeup, including eyeliner and mascara, should be replaced every 4-6 months. Eye shadow has a longer shelf life and should be replaced every year. This helps prevent bacteria from forming in your makeup. If you notice any burning, itching, or watering from your eyes, wash your makeup off immediately and throw it away. This could be a sign of an infection and if not treated, could lead to vision problems. 

 

                        makeup

 

Dilated Eye Exams

To prevent eye diseases and vision complications from occurring, women should receive dilated eye exams as recommended by their eye doctor. Vision loss can be prevented through early detection at regular, dilated eye exams and early treatment. Dilated eye exams are the only way to check the entire health of the eye, making it one of the first lines of defense against eye diseases and preventable vision loss. 

                                                                                                                                                                                  

                                                 dilation

                 

OCuSOFT, Inc. Support

OCuSOFT Inc., a company dedicated to supplying safe eye and skin care products to patients and the vision world, is donating up to $50,000 to Prevent Blindness during the month of April. With every online purchase, 10% is donated to Prevent Blindness.  

 

            Ocusoft picture 1    

 Support this sight-saving cause today! Learn more about OCuSOFT, Inc.

 

Help us share the importance of vision health for all ages!

The sight-saving work Prevent Blindness Wisconsin does is funded through generous donations from our partners, sponsors, and volunteers. Help us help you see more clearly.

                                                                           Donate

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram to learn more about women’s vision health.

Sources:

https://eyesde.com/eye-health/conditions/dry-eye/

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/170743.php

https://www.narayananethralaya.org/age-related-macular-degeneration-amd/

http://www.clker.com/clipart-578463.html

https://www.pngarts.com/explore/tag/baby-rattle

https://hdclipartall.com/img-4296.html

http://clipartpost.com/baby-rattle-clipart_5326/

https://www.staples.ca/en/International-No-Smoking-Signs/product_SS2000148_1-CA_1_20001

http://www.clipartpanda.com/clipart_images/sunglass-clip-art-vector-19591439

http://www.meeting.it/la-forza-delle-nostre-radici/

                                                                                

   (414) 765-0505                                                  wisconsin.preventblindness.org                                                [email protected]